Tag Archives: autumn

Miso soup of the day: Kasu-jiru (sake lees soup)

‘Sake kasu (sake lees)’ – an edible byproduct from sake – has been re-evaluated and getting attention in the past few years here. It’s one of the traditional Japanese fermented food. Amazingly nutritious and versatile, ‘sake kasu’ can be used in many ways, from cooking to making all-natural facial masks! This ‘kasu-jiru’ is a very basic recipe using ‘sake kasu’ suitable for cold days.

Cut root vegetables (carrot, daikon raddish, potato etc.) and salmon or pork (I used salmon this time) into bite-size pieces and cook in water with ‘sake-kasu’ (40-50g per person). Then flavor with miso paste (or soy sauce). Top with thinly sliced ginger, chopped scallions and red pepper as you like.

It will make you warm inside and help you adjust a physical condition 🙂


The roots of the scallions I used for making miso soup and planted on Oct 2 (see the details from here) have regrown like this!

Japanese Dessert Named ‘Sweet Potato’

When they hear the English word “sweet potato”, most Japanese people think of this dessert rather than the sweet potato as a vegetable. My mom makes this dessert every autumn, and she gave us some pieces last weekend. For a long time, I thought this was a western dessert and didn’t know that it was invebted by a Japanese patissier in Tokyo during the Meiji era. Today it’s sold in many confectionary stores nationwide and widely cooked at home as well.

So here’s my mom’s recipe 🙂

Ingredients:
300g Japanese sweet potatoes. 30g butter. 1 egg yoak (1/2 to mix with sweet potatoes, 1/2 for the surface). 3 tbsp sugar. 2-3 tbsp milk (or fresh cream), 1 tbsp whiskey (or rum).

Method:
Microwave (or steam) sweet potatoes until soft to peel, mash and strain. Add butter, sugar while the sweet potatoes are hot and mix well. Then add egg yolk, milk and whisky. Mix further. Put this sweet potato cream in foil cups, brush some egg yolk on the surface. Bake in the preheated oven (200°C) until browned.

Miso soup of the day: Eddoe & daikon radish

Several years ago, a friend of mine gave me some eddoes that his mom grew with care and taught me this recipe. It’s been my favorite since then.

Cut eddoes and daikon radishes in bar rectangles.  

 

Generally, miso should be added just before taking the pot from over the fire. As for this recipe, however, to prevent the pot from boiling over, it is recommended to add small amount of miso paste before the water boils. 

 

Miso soup of the day: Sweet potato, mushroom & scallion

Miso soup ideas using the ingredients in season – 

Diced sweet potato, shimeji mushroom and scallion. 

   

When I get sallions, I like to cut the whole bunch at once and store them in the freezer.    

 
The roots go to my tiny balcony garden later to regrow 🙂